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Ranged Combat
Four modifiers impact a runner making a shot: environmental, recoil, situationl, and wound.

Environmental
To determine the Environmental modifier, take only the most severe environmental condition and use the associated modifier. If there are two or more environmental modifiers tied for most severe, bump the modifier up a category. Note that Range is an environmental modifier.
Visibility Light/Glare Wind Range Modifier
Clear Full Light / No Glare None or Light Breeze Short -
Light Rain / Fog / Smoke Partial Light / Weak Glare Light Winds Medium -1
Moderate Rain / Fog / Smoke Dim Light / Moderate Glare Moderate Winds Long -3
Heavy Rain / Fog / Smoke Total Darkness / Blinding Glare Strong Winds Extreme -6
Combination of two or more conditions at the -6 level row -10

Compensation Effect
Flare Compensation Glare conditions shift two rows up
Image Magnification Reduce Range conditions by one category
Low-Light Vision Treat Partial Light and Dim Light as Full Light
Thermographic Vision Visibility and Light conditions shift one row up
Tracer Rounds (FA) Wind in rows below Light Winds and Range in rows below Short shift one row up.
Smartlink Wind shifts one row up
Sunglasses Glare conditions shift one row up / Light conditions shift one row down
Ultrasound Visibility shifts one row up, ignore Light conditions (within 50 meters)
Condition How to Compensate
Visibility Ultrasound, Thermographic
Light Low-Light, Sunglasses, Thermographic, Ultrasound
Wind Tracer Rounds, Smartlink
Range Image Magnification, Tracer Rounds

Recoil
Recoil becomes more of a strain the more bullets you shoot. If you are firing two guns at the same time, shots from the one affect the other, so bullets from each gun add to your total recoil value.
To figure out your recoil penalty, start with the amount of recoil compensation you have. You get 1 free point anytime you start firing, then you add your Strength/3 (rounded up) and the recoil compensation of any guns you are prepared to shoot (that means loaded and in your hands; if you have to put bullets in it or draw it from a holster or do anything of the sort, you’re not ready to shoot that weapon). Then subtract any bullets you’re about to fire. If the number is a negative number, that’s your recoil penalty; subtract the penalty from your dice pool before you roll for the attack.
When making multiple firearm attacks in a single Action Phase, calculate the total recoil penalty based on the bullets to be fired that round and remove it from your dice pool before splitting the pool for the multiple attacks.

Progressive Recoil
Recoil accumulates with every bullet fired until the attacker stops firing to bring the gun (or guns) back under control. Recoil penalties are cumulative over every Action Phase and Combat Turn unless the character takes, or is forced into, an action other than shooting for an entire Action Phase. Recoil is cumulative to the character, not the weapon he’s firing. Recoil accumulates from every shot the character takes, not just from the firing of the same weapon.

Single Shots
Single Shot (SS) weapons have the disadvantage of not being able to fire multiple rounds in a single Action Phase, but they have the advantage of not suffering from cumulative recoil when fired in single shot mode. It is assumed to be taking time to chamber the next round or otherwise make the SS weapon ready to fire again; this pause between shots means characters using these weapons do not suffer from progressive recoil. Recoil penalties apply when using the Multiple Attacks Action.

Vehicle and Drone Mounted Weapons
Vehicle and Drone mounted weapons have the advantage of a sturdy platform from which to fire. The vehicle itself has enough mass to absorb the bulk of the recoil created by the weapon. Mounted weapons have Recoil Compensation equal to the Body of the vehicle plus any built in Recoil Compensation of the weapon.

Situational Modifiers
Situation Attacker's Modifier
Attacker firing from cover with imaging device -3
Attacker firing from a moving vehicle -2
Attacker in melee combat -3
Attacker running -2
Attacker using off-hand weapon -2
Attacker wounded -Wound modifier
Blind fire -6
Called shot -4
Previously aimed with Take Aim +1 Dice Pool, +1 Accuracy
Wireless Smartgun +1(gear) / +2(implanted)


Firing Modes
Mode Defense Mod Rounds Used Notes
Single-Shot (SS) 0 1 No Recoil
Semi-Automatic (SA) 0 1  
Semi-Automatic Burst (SB) -2 3  
Burst Fire (BF) -2 3  
Long Burst (LB) or Full Auto (FA)(Simple) -5 6  
Full Auto (FA)(Complex) -9 10  
Suppressive Fire Duck or Cover 20 No Recoil


Shotguns
  Shotguns described in the Street Gear section (p. 429) fire slug rounds. Characters can load them with shot rounds, but shot rounds have little effect against 21st-century body armor. To determine the damage done by shot rounds, apply the flechette ammunition rules to the Damage Value indicated for the weapon.
  Shot rounds spread when fired, creating a cone of shot extending outward from the shotgun’s muzzle. This allows the shot to hit multiple targets, but with reduced effectiveness due to the spread of the shot pellets over a wider area. The mechanism that controls this spread is called the choke.
  The shotgun user can set his weapon’s choke for a narrow spread, medium spread, or wide spread. Changing the choke setting requires a Simple Action (or a Free Action if the shotgun is smartlinked).

Choke Settings
Narrow Spread
The target gets -1 dice pool modifier for defense at all ranges.

Medium Spread
  At short range, you get –1 DV, targets get –3 defense, and up to two targets within a 2-meter spread can be targeted using the same roll. At medium range, you get –3 DV, targets get –3 defense, and up to three targets within a 4-meter spread can be targeted using the same roll. At long range, you get –5 DV, –1 Accuracy, targets get –3 defense, and up to four targets within a 6-meter spread can be targeted using the same roll. At extreme range, you get –7 DV, –1 Accuracy, targets get –3 defense, and up to six targets within a 8-meter spread can be targeted using the same roll. Medium spreads cannot be used with Called Shots.

Wide Spread
  At short range, you get –3 DV, targets get –5 defense, and up to two targets within a 3-meter spread can be targeted using the same roll. At medium range, you get –5 DV, targets get –5 defense, and up to three targets within a 6-meter spread can be targeted using the same roll. At long range, you get –7 DV, –1 Accuracy, targets get –5 defense, and up to four targets within a 9-meter spread can be targeted using the same roll. At extreme range, you get –9 DV, –1 Accuracy, targets get –5 defense, and up to six targets within a 12-meter spread can be targeted using the same roll. Wide spreads cannot be used with Called Shots.

Projectiles
Thrown weapons
Shuriken
  This multi-edged airfoil throwing blade is available in many different styles. A character can ready Agility ÷ 2 shuriken per Ready Weapon action.
Throwing Knife
  This category covers a variety of slim knives or spikes. A character can ready Agility ÷ 2 throwing knives per Ready Weapon action.
Grenades
  When throwing a grenade, choose a location as a target. Use a Throw Weapon Simple Action and make a Throwing Weapons + Agility [Physical] (3) Test modified for range and all the usual conditions. Success means the grenade lands right where you wanted. If you don’t meet the threshold, the grenade scatters. The gamemaster determines scatter by consulting the Scatter Table (p. 182). Three hits on the test means no scatter, but it is still possible to hit the target if the scatter roll is low and the thrower got some hits (see Determine Scatter, p. 182). This all goes back to the old saying: “Close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades.”
  Grenades are small, self-contained explosive or gasdelivery packages. They may come with a built-in timer to detonate after a pre-set amount of time (usually three seconds), a motion-sensor set to detonate on impact, or a wireless link set to detonate upon remote command. The type of detonation device determines the special rules and timing of grenade explosions.

Built-in Timer: This detonation method uses the attacker’s Initiative Score as the determining factor for detonation. The grenade is thrown during the character’s Action Phase and detonates in the next Combat Turn on the Initiative Score in which it was thrown minus 10, regardless of any additional changes to the thrower’s Initiative Score.

Motion Sensor: Grenades using a motion sensor are extremely dangerous. Once armed (about a second after the sensor is activated) the grenade explodes after any sudden stop or change in direction, meaning hitting the wall, floor, or target. This method uses the standard Ranged Attack rules but adds an extra step if it misses the target (no net hits on the attack roll). After a failed attack roll, the thrower must roll for scatter and the grenade scatters the full amount before exploding immediately. A glitch on the attack roll means the grenade does not detonate on initial impact but instead doubles the scatter distance and explodes. A Critical Glitch means the thrower waited too long, and the throw sets off the grenade. The grenade detonates immediately, affecting the attacker and those around him. (Warned you it was dangerous.)

Wireless Link: This is the safest way to throw a grenade in some aspects, but it also comes with some risk and effort. The thrower (or anyone else who has a mark on the grenade) can detonate it by a wireless link. This requires the attacker to have a direct neural interface to the linked device and use the Change Wireless Device Mode Free Action. This method also reduces scatter. Without a DNI the attacker must use the Change Linked Device Mode Simple Action in their next or any of their subsequent Action Phases to detonate the grenade and scatter is not reduced.

Grenade Launcers, Rockets, & Missles
When you fire a grenade, rocket, or missile you use a Fire Weapon Simple Action and roll a Heavy Weapons + Agility [Accuracy] (3) Test modified for range and all the usual conditions. Success means the launched weapon hits right where you wanted. If you don’t meet the threshold, the projectile scatters. The gamemaster determines scatter by consulting the Scatter Table.

Projectile Triggers
Much like thrown grenades, projectile explosives have a variety of triggering mechanisms. Timers, wireless detonators, and impact triggers/motion sensors can all be used with projectile explosives. All methods still utilize the scatter rules (if a bit modified for the motion sensor) since these weapons all have some inherent level of inaccuracy.

Built-in Timer: This detonation method uses the attackers Initiative Score as the determining factor for detonation. The weapon is launched during the characters Action Phase and detonates in the next Combat Turn on the same Initiative Score in which it was fired minus 10, regardless of any changes to the attacker’s Initiative Score.

Motion Sensor: Projectile explosives using a motion sensor or impact trigger are extremely dangerous. Once armed (after the projectile has traveled 5 meters unless the safety features are disarmed), the projectile explodes after any sudden stop or change in direction, meaning hitting the wall, floor, or target. This method uses the standard Ranged Attack rules but adds an extra step if it misses the target (no net hits on the attack roll). After a failed attack roll, you must roll for scatter and the projectile scatters the full amount before exploding immediately. A glitch on the attack roll means the projectile does not detonate on initial impact and scatters further, double the scatter distance. A Critical Glitch means the arming mechanism misfires and the explosive detonates immediately, affecting the attacker and those around him. (Did we mention these things are extremely dangerous?)

Wireless Link: This is the safest way to launch a weapon but requires a little extra effort. The firer (or anyone else who has the projectile subscribed to their PAN) can detonate the projectile wirelessly. This requires the attacker to have a direct neural interface to the linked device and use the Change Wireless Device Mode Free Action. This method also reduces scatter. Without a DNI the attacker must use the Change Linked Device Mode Simple Action in their next or any of their subsequent Action Phases to detonate the projectile, but the scatter distance is not reduced.

Determine Scatter
  If the attacker misses their intended landing spot, the gamemaster must determine the projectile’s scatter. The gamemaster determines the direction of the scatter by rolling 2D6 and consulting the Scatter Diagram. The 7 arrow indicates the direction of the launch, so a result of 7 means the projectile continued on past the target, while a result of 12 or 2 means the projectile scatters back in the direction of the attacker.
  Having determined the direction of the scatter, the gamemaster calculates the distance. The Scatter Table indicates a number of dice rolled based on the projectile, which is reduced by the number of hits the attacker rolled. This is used to determine the final scatter distance. If the scatter distance is reduced to 0 or less, the projectile hits the target exactly. (Note that additional hits do not add to Damage Values).

Scatter Diagram


Scatter Table
Type Scatter
Standard Grenade (1D6 - Hits) meters
Aerodynamic Grenade (2D6 - Hits) meters
Grenade Launcher (3D6 - Hits) meters
Missile Launcher (4D6 - Hits) meters
Rocket Launcher (5D6 - Hits) meters

Blasts in a Confined Space
When a grenade detonates in a confined space, such as a hallway or room, the gamemaster must first determine whether any barriers (usually walls) stood firm against the explosion. Consult the Destroying Barriers rules (p. 197). If the walls or doors hold up, the blast is channeled. Otherwise, determine blast effects normally.
  If the walls hold, the shock wave reflects off of them, continuing back in the direction from which it came. If this rebounding shock wave maintains enough Damage Value to reach a character, that character is subject to the appropriate blast effect. If the character is struck a second time by the shock wave (once as it headed out and again as it rebounded), the Damage Value of the blast is equal to the combined Damage Value of the two waves.
  Theoretically, a detonating explosive’s blast could rebound repeatedly off each of the six surfaces in a small, well-built room, raising the effective Damage Value of the blast to a value far higher than the original damage of the grenade. This is known as the "chunky salsa effect."

Multiple Simultaneous Blasts
When multiple explosives detonate at once the effects are similar to those of a blast in a confined space (more chunky salsa). When two explosions occur on the same Combat Initiative Score and both blasts effect the same character add half the value of the lower DVs to the highest DV and apply it all as a single modified Damage Value for the purposes of Damage Resistance tests. For AP calculations, use the best AP and improve it by 1 for every additional explosion.

Sensor Attacks
To detect a person, critter, or vehicle with sensors, the character/vehicle must make a successful Sensor Test. Characters roll Perception + Intuition [Sensor], vehicles roll Pilot + Clearsight [Sensor]. If the target is trying to evade detection, make this an Opposed Test versus the target’s Infiltration + Agility [Physical] (metahumans, critters), Infiltration (Vehicle) + Reaction [Handling] (driven vehicles), or Pilot + [Model] Stealth [Handling] (drones). Since vehicle stealth is limited by the driver’s ability, the dice applied for Infiltration skill should not exceed the driver’s appropriate Vehicle skill. Sensors are designed to detect the “signature” (emissions, composition, sound, etc.) of other vehicles, so modifiers from the Signature Table apply to the detecting vehicle’s dice pool.

Sensor Targeting
A character can use the vehicle’s Sensor Attribute to help with Gunnery and has two options for doing so: passive targeting and active targeting. Both options can be used to help make the weapon more accurate and get a better lock on the defender, making it harder to avoid an incoming attack.

Passive Targeting
  In passive targeting, the vehicle’s Sensor attribute substitutes for the Accuracy of the weapon as the advanced targeting system makes up for any flaws in the weapon design. The attacker rolls Gunnery + Logic [Sensor]. The target’s Signature modifiers are also applied as a dice pool modifier.

Active Targeting
  Active targeting uses a vehicle’s Sensors to lock onto a target. To use active targeting, the character/vehicle must first make a Sensor Test to lock onto a target. This requires a Simple Action. If the character/vehicle wins the test, the net hits are applied as a negative modifier to the Defense Test on the attack. If no hits are achieved, the sensors fail to lock onto the target, and an active targeting attack cannot be made. Once a target has been locked onto, active targeting can be used against it without requiring additional Sensor Tests.
  If the target vehicle somehow breaks sensor contact, a new target lock must be acquired. This can be done by using an action to Evade Detection, which is an Opposed Test using the appropriate Sensor Defense Test (see Sensor Defense Table).

Sensor Defense Table
Defender Sensor Defense Tests
Metahuman, Critter Infiltration + Agility [Physical]
Vehicle Infiltration (Vehicle) + Reaction [Handling]
Drone Pilot + [Model]Stealth [Handling]

Signature Table
Large and oversized vehicles
(trains, construction vehicles,
zeppelins, tractor-trailers, airliners)
+3
Electric-powered vehicles -3
Metahuman, Critter -3
Drones -3
Micro-drones -6


Range Table
Dice Pool Modifier Short
+0
Medium
-1
Long
-3
Extreme
-6
Pistols RANGE IN METERS
Taser 0-5 6-10 11-15 16-20
Hold-Out Pistol 0-5 6-15 16-30 31-50
Light Pistol 0-5 6-15 16-30 31-50
Heavy Pistol 0-5 6-20 21-40 41-60
Automatics RANGE IN METERS
Machine Pistol 0-5 6-15 16-30 31-50
SMG 0-10 11-40 41-80 81-150
Assault Rifle 0-25 26-150 151-350 351-550
Longarms RANGE IN METERS
Shotgun (flechette) 0-15 16-30 31-45 46-60
Shotgun (slug) 0-10 11-40 41-80 81-150
Sniper Rifle 0-50 51-350 351-800 801-1,500
Heavy Weapons RANGE IN METERS
Light Machinegun 0-25 26-200 201-400 401-800
Medium/Heavy Machinegun 0-40 41-250 251-750 751-1,200
Assault Cannon 0-50 51-300 301-750 751-1,500
Grenade Launcher 5-50 51-100 101-150 151-500
Missile Launcher 20-70 71-150 151-450 451-1,500
Ballistic Projectiles RANGE IN METERS
Bow 0-STR To STR x 10 To STR x 30 To STR x 60
Light Crossbow 0-6 7-24 25-60 61-120
Medium Crossbow 0-9 10-36 37-90 90-150
Heavy Crossbow 0-15 16-45 46-120 121-180
Impact Projectiles RANGE IN METERS
Thrown Knife 0-STR To STR x 2 To STR x 3 To STR x 5
Shuriken 0-STR To STR x 2 To STR x 5 To STR x 7
Thrown Grenades RANGE IN METERS
Standard 0-STR x 2 To STR x 4 To STR x 6 To STR x 10
Aerodynamic 0-STR x 2 To STR x 4 To STR x 8 To STR x 15